Le Voyage de Thomas William Newton via Liège, 1860 (english)

24 septembre 2007

« Ten o’clock, and we reach the elevated town of Ans, whence we look down on the valley of the Meuse and the steeples of Liege, and the scenery now becomes greatly interesting, and increases in beauty as we advance.


From Ans, an inclined plane brings us speedily to Liege, that station adjoining the Quai d’Avroy, on the south bank of the river Meuse.


Thoughts of Louis and Burgundy, the warrior-bishops, William de la Marck, and the brave Liegois, grouping round the  » Quentin Durward  » of Sir Walter Scott, crowd on the mind as we gaze on the smoke-grimed but beautiful city of Liege; which, placed in a fertile plain, watered by the mingled streams of the Meuse and Ourthe, and girdled with a zone of vine-clad mountains, has been compared to isolated sunny spots occasionally met with in the fairest portions of Switzerland.


Presently, after passing through many tunnels, the railway threads the delightful valley through which winds the we stop at the station of Chaudfontaine, celebrated for the hot baths which its name implies.


Interspersed among lawns and bowers, listening to German minstrels, groups of yawning water-drinkers were listlessly sauntering, so utterly unconscious of anything to do, that they reminded one of those unhappy souls who, according to Beckford, seemed condemned to an eternal lounge for having trifled away their existence.


The train stopping nearly two hours at Verviers, allowed us time to ramble amidst the romantic scenery on all sides surrounding the station. « 

How we saw Belgium, the Rhine, the Meuse, and Paris, in fifteen days, Thomas William Newton


Voyageurs et visiteurs à Liège
Liège au 19ème siècle

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